Tuesday, October 26th, 2021

World of Warcraft: Rich King’s Wrath-Pandemic System Board Game Review

The World of Warcraft universe has been steadily expanding since its release nearly 15 years ago, adding many new characters, lands to explore, and enemies to conquer. But one of its most popular stories follows the fall of hero Arthas and his subsequent promotion to Lich King. For those who are returning to North Lend and trying to attack Ice Crown Citadel again, this board game will definitely scratch that itch for you.

Based on an extension of the same name, the World of Warcraft: Wrath of the Lich King-pandemic system board game (wow, that’s a bite) is for up to 5 players, including all the traps of the popular MMO. A collaborative board game. It has iconic heroes, unique abilities, fighting scarges, and quests for your party, all uniquely layered on the foundation of the popular pandemic series of board games. However, this is not just a reskin. All elements of gameplay are faithfully tuned to make you feel at home in Blizzard’s popular universe.

What’s in the box

From the moment you open the box, you’ll see that this board game was created with attention to detail and careful attention to all components. The vast game board is about 20 “x 30” in size, with dozens of familiar locations from across Azeroth, including Naxxramas, Dalaran, and Ulduar.

In addition, seven iconic characters from the Warcraft universe will be featured: Thrull, Jain Proudmoor, Sylvanus Windrunner, Varian Urin, Tyrion Fordling, Muradin Bronze Beard, and Ladybeard. Each playable character comes with a detailed minifigure to represent them during gameplay. Of course, there are also Rich King’s own incredibly detailed figurines and hordes of his undead companions, including three abominations and dozens of tiny ghouls. One thing to note is that some of these figurines have a lot of incredible sharp points. After poking myself many times, I had to be more careful when grabbing them.

Each playable character also comes with a hero seat with unique abilities, a health bar, and back lore. Like all of this game, the hero seats are adorned with gorgeous original art from the Blizzard people. There is also a deck of 63 hero cards used throughout the game, all featuring detailed artwork. I was surprised that little artwork was reused from Hearthstone, Blizzard’s popular deck-building game based on the world of World of Warcraft. It feels like a whole new adventure, not just a repackaged cash-in.

This is more than just reskin. All gameplay elements are faithfully tuned to make you feel at home in the WoW world.


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In addition, it includes 10 quest sheets, 30 scarge cards, reference cards to assist players during gameplay, various markers, high quality cardboard cutouts for assembling fortresses and a large replica of the Ice Crown Citadel. There is a punch board. A press seal bag is included to store everything between play sessions. As with many other pandemic series games, I’m surprised that the gamebox space isn’t wasted very much.

Rules and how to play

World of Warcraft: The goal of the Wrath of the Lich King board game is simple. Complete 3 quests to earn unique rewards before attacking Icecrown Citadel and ending Lich King. However, Rich King’s Scourge is steadily spreading throughout North Lend, and the party will only be consumed after completing the task.

Each player starts by choosing and playing one of the seven heroes. All of these have the unique ability to somehow contribute to the overall success of the team. At the bottom of every hero sheet is a series of numbers that represent the character’s health. Players need to be careful when exploring and fighting the entire map.

The turn is played like the original pandemic board game, with each player performing a total of four actions, including moving across the game board, fighting enemies, exploring, or healing. However, rather than just curing the illness, players are much more engaged in momentary gameplay. Players also accumulate cards such as attacks and defenses to assist in combat, healing cards to replenish health, and travel cards to move quickly through the board. The number of fortress cards you can add to your deck is also limited, and you can place fortresses around the map to act as a kind of “fast move” location for you and your team.

Once the Lich King’s undead army has spread across the map, players can choose to fight Scourge as one of their turn actions. By rolling two dice, players can deal damage, block incoming attacks, and play cards from their hand to assist in combat. Characters in the same space can also team up and fight, making you feel like you’re having a party together while reaping the waves of your enemies.

In addition to combat, players can also choose to participate in quests as one of their turn actions. Completing a quest is an important part of a team’s winning conditions, so it’s important to keep an eye on the progress of your party’s quests. The game board is divided into three areas, indicated by the color of the internal space. Each region contains one of three quest sheets (a total of nine available) that teams must work together to complete during the game. The quest requires multiple player turns to complete with a combination of dice rolls, cards in hand, and the help of teammates, and requires good tweaking.

All quest sheets have unique boss enemies that damage quest players, reduce the number of dice you can roll, prevent healing, and more. When players reach the end of the quest, they will reveal a unique reward that provides a powerful single-use card that can be used by the team to help them turn the tide in their favor.

The Quest system definitely works, but I wanted it to be a little more concrete. It is summarized as moving the marker along an essentially straight path and does not feel as lively and attractive as combat. It feels like all of these iconic raid bosses have appeared on the quest sheet and missed the opportunity to never really interact with them in a meaningful way. This also applies to the last encounter with Rich King. This is effectively a longer “quest” and doesn’t raise your stakes too much.

That said, the momentary gameplay of strategicing with teammates when pushing back an invading scarge on the board while trying to complete a quest feels like playing other pandemic board games. It completely encapsulates its characteristic stress. Every action taken should be carefully considered, as things can quickly get out of hand and one wrong move can lead to your inevitable defeat.

Rich King’s angry board game turned out to be a bit more difficult than a traditional pandemic board game. Even the easiest difficulty level consisted of five players. The turn is a bit complicated because it manages not only the game board, but also the health of your hero. As with most games, as the group’s experience grows, you’ll be able to anticipate setbacks and plan accordingly. And for those who are ready to take on more challenges, there are three increasing challenges to make Scourge more powerful and reduce the number of available locations. There is also a solo play mode, but it was still a fascinating experience. However, the fun of this game lies in team-based decision making.

There is also a solo play mode, but it was still a fascinating experience.


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With 7 unique heroes and a total of 9 quests, there are plenty of replays and dozens of game sessions to enjoy.Due to the cooperative nature of the game combined with dice-based battles and quests, the Wrath of the Lich King board game very A light version of D & D that can be completed in about an hour.

Where to buy

World of Warcraft: The Wrath of the Lich King board game has a suggested retail price of $ 59.99 and is available at the following retailers: