Tuesday, October 26th, 2021

Dread Hunger is a PvP adventure that tests friendship.

Even though I was planning the death of a fellow crew member with occult magic, and even if they killed my allies for fear of betraying me, the dread hangers never reassured me. In a good way. When working with my teammates past the iceberg and navigating the explorer’s ship through the cold snowstorm, the threat of betrayal from the inside was ubiquitous and the temptation to keep checking over my shoulder was in front of me. I was at odds with accomplishing the task set in. As the evil Thrall working against the group, the large number and fear of being discovered forced me to be wise about when and where to act against the group. Dread Hunger always challenged me to be smart no matter which side I was on. And it made me nervously laugh, scream, and cause an absolute explosion in every match.

Dread Hunger is initially a social deception game, but it is also an adventure game with survival and craft mechanics, exploration and combat, and these components can collide with social deception. Combat in particular can be a problem. When you give a player a gun, you want to shoot someone. If left unchecked, things will soon be in free PvP mode with nothing needed for social deception games, but developers will give such a simple answer in a future update. We are working to make it difficult to achieve.

Screenshot of Dread Hunger

The best mechanic I’ve found as one of the dangerous Thralls is to get one respawn after each player is killed. This makes it easy for me to aim at me if I hunt down alone and try to kill myself. Instead, I become poisonous and creative and use dark rituals to dry cannibal packs for those traveling alone, obstruct ships, or river precious coal. Used by crew members who had to find other small ways to undermine the group, such as throwing into a river.

On the contrary, as a good man, I wanted to kill someone who was suspected of being a traitor. But as I learned when I killed an innocent person with mere suspicion, dread hangers do not reward this kind of action. By killing someone based on speculation, instead I accidentally killed an ally and greatly reduced my chances of survival-not to mention that people were far more suspicious of me! Instead, finding a creative way to expose the bad guys was my only hope of winning the day. The longer I played, the more I understood the nuances of when the group was ripe for betrayal and when it was appropriate to act on the suspicion of others, and was rewarded for its discipline and restraint.

The toolboxes on both sides to reveal the truth were complex and packed with the various strategies I could take. As a regular crew member, I was able to show my loyalty by publicly contributing to the progress of the group, such as supplying coal to the ship’s engine and healing injured crew members. And by watching who was useless and / or near those who were unlucky, we were able to help guess who the traitor was.

As a villain, I had many dark rituals at my disposal. Each is intended to be used indirectly, filling the level with a thick fog, obscuring everyone’s vision and taking time for most tasks. And instead of killing someone altogether, I was able to simply pull my leg and lengthen everything, increasing the chances of a group failure. For example, when you “wrongly” shoot an ally while fighting a wolf, wasting valuable time and resources and healing her.

The longer I played, the more I understood the nuances of when the group was ripe for betrayal and when it was appropriate to act on the suspicion of others, and was rewarded for its discipline and restraint.


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The delicate balance between adventure games and social deception is a challenging balance, but so far Dread Hunger has forced players to play wisely or suffer from inappropriate results. So it looks like you’re ready to work on that task. I’m looking forward to seeing what’s waiting for the next game.